Scientist, Bowden on future impact of computers on society; 1962

Scientist, Bertram Bowden, envisions the potential future impact of computers on the people of the United Kingdom including their ways of working and hopes that the country can keep pace with the developments in technology alongside the United States; 1962. "It's impossible to be dogmatic. They may do the most extraordinary things. One can imagine them running matrimonial agencies, hearing divorce suits and prescribing pills within the next 15 or 20 years; this is pure speculation. Of one thing I can be sure, they're going to have the most profound effect on all white collar workers, people who work with pencil and paper, pens and paper and typewriters. They're going to transform the organisation of factories, of large businesses and of countries. Of those countries which are without them will suffer by comparison with those that do ... We are importing far too many computers and exporting far too few. The Americans have been tremendously more successful that we have although ten years ago we were neck and neck. It's very largely due, I think, to the fact that they're Government has been far more enterprising than ours, their treasure has helped their industry much more than ours has and I hope very much that, sooner or later, our own Government will be as imaginative as the Americans have been and help our own industry develop one of the most important and promising and profitable applications of modern science. " (LCA5856D - AEVZ001J)
Scientist, Bertram Bowden, envisions the potential future impact of computers on the people of the United Kingdom including their ways of working and hopes that the country can keep pace with the developments in technology alongside the United States; 1962. "It's impossible to be dogmatic. They may do the most extraordinary things. One can imagine them running matrimonial agencies, hearing divorce suits and prescribing pills within the next 15 or 20 years; this is pure speculation. Of one thing I can be sure, they're going to have the most profound effect on all white collar workers, people who work with pencil and paper, pens and paper and typewriters. They're going to transform the organisation of factories, of large businesses and of countries. Of those countries which are without them will suffer by comparison with those that do ... We are importing far too many computers and exporting far too few. The Americans have been tremendously more successful that we have although ten years ago we were neck and neck. It's very largely due, I think, to the fact that they're Government has been far more enterprising than ours, their treasure has helped their industry much more than ours has and I hope very much that, sooner or later, our own Government will be as imaginative as the Americans have been and help our own industry develop one of the most important and promising and profitable applications of modern science. " (LCA5856D - AEVZ001J)
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Editorial #:
1744387100
Collection:
BBC Editorial
Date created:
30 August, 1962
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Licence type:
Rights-ready
Release info:
Not released. More information
Clip length:
00:01:15:00
Location:
United Kingdom
Mastered to:
QuickTime 10-bit ProRes 422 (HQ) HD 1920x1080 25p
Source:
BBC Editorial
Object name:
lca5856d_machineslikemen_300862-28-drbvboden