Last Candy Floss Maker of Kashmir

Ghulam Muhammad Bhat burn a sprit lamp to heat up his typical machine to make cotton candy or candy floss, inside his home, on January 2, 2018, in Srinagar, the summer capital of Indian administered Kashmir, India. Ghulam Muhammad Bhat, who belongs to Srinagar citys Chattabal area, has for over four decades kept alive the tradition of making and selling candy floss in the old city, Bhat is the last of his ilk. Bhat, who never married, has a speech impediment but is able to communicate well with children, who form his clientele. Children eagerly await the clinking of the brass bell which Bhat uses to announce his arrival in the narrow lanes and alleys of the city. Every day, Bhat, 65, prepares the candy floss at his living room, which doubles up as his manufacturing unit. His relatives say that he enjoys his work and walks several kilometers daily to reach his little customers. Bhats nephew Muhammad Ishaq, with whom he shares the house, said his uncle is the only person left in the city who made the candy floss locally. He said his uncle sells the candy floss in a traditional cubical glass-fitted box unlike others. Bhat got interested in making candy floss at an early age and learnt the process from a person who operated from somewhere near the area. Bhat welcomes us in his room which is choc-a-bloc with things of daily use. He explains to us how candy floss is made and points towards sugar, the main ingredient in candy floss, and then at the traces of colour that are poured through a slot in the middle of a spinning drum, which is run by a hand-driven paddle. A spirit lamp at the base of the slot melts the sugar and with the outward spin, hundreds of thin strands are generated through small openings, which once collected, form the candy floss. Years of making candy floss has made Bhat adept at his work. He collects each ball of candy floss and places them separately in his glass box. As the box is half full, Bhat stops, gestur
Ghulam Muhammad Bhat burn a sprit lamp to heat up his typical machine to make cotton candy or candy floss, inside his home, on January 2, 2018, in Srinagar, the summer capital of Indian administered Kashmir, India. Ghulam Muhammad Bhat, who belongs to Srinagar citys Chattabal area, has for over four decades kept alive the tradition of making and selling candy floss in the old city, Bhat is the last of his ilk. Bhat, who never married, has a speech impediment but is able to communicate well with children, who form his clientele. Children eagerly await the clinking of the brass bell which Bhat uses to announce his arrival in the narrow lanes and alleys of the city. Every day, Bhat, 65, prepares the candy floss at his living room, which doubles up as his manufacturing unit. His relatives say that he enjoys his work and walks several kilometers daily to reach his little customers. Bhats nephew Muhammad Ishaq, with whom he shares the house, said his uncle is the only person left in the city who made the candy floss locally. He said his uncle sells the candy floss in a traditional cubical glass-fitted box unlike others. Bhat got interested in making candy floss at an early age and learnt the process from a person who operated from somewhere near the area. Bhat welcomes us in his room which is choc-a-bloc with things of daily use. He explains to us how candy floss is made and points towards sugar, the main ingredient in candy floss, and then at the traces of colour that are poured through a slot in the middle of a spinning drum, which is run by a hand-driven paddle. A spirit lamp at the base of the slot melts the sugar and with the outward spin, hundreds of thin strands are generated through small openings, which once collected, form the candy floss. Years of making candy floss has made Bhat adept at his work. He collects each ball of candy floss and places them separately in his glass box. As the box is half full, Bhat stops, gestur
Last Candy Floss Maker of Kashmir
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Credit:
NurPhoto / Contributor
Editorial #:
900470764
Collection:
NurPhoto
Date created:
02 January, 2018
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Not released. More information
Source:
NurPhoto
Object name:
kabli-lastcand180102_npxfj
Max file size:
6000 x 5838 px (50.80 x 49.43 cm) - 300 dpi - 11 MB