Elephant Dung Coffee Produces The World's Most Expensive Cup : News Photo

Elephant Dung Coffee Produces The World's Most Expensive Cup

Credit: 
Paula Bronstein / Staff
GOLDEN TRIANGLE, THAILAND - DECEMBER 10: A Thai elephant scoops up a coffee bean mixture with fruit and rice at an elephant camp at the Anantara Golden Triangle resort on December 10, 2012 in Golden Triangle, northern Thailand. Black Ivory Coffee, started by Canadian coffee expert Blake Dinkin, is made from Thai arabica hand picked beans. The coffee is created from a process whereby coffee beans are naturally refined by a Thai elephant. It takes about 15-30 hours for the elephant to digest the beans, and later they are plucked from their dung and washed and roasted. Approximately 10,000 beans are picked to produce 1kg of roasted coffee. At USD 1,100 per kilogram or USD 500 per pound, the cost per serving of the elephant coffee equals USD 50, making the exotic new brew the world's priciest. It takes 33 kilograms of raw coffee cherries to produce 1 kilo of Black Ivory Coffee. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
Caption:
GOLDEN TRIANGLE, THAILAND - DECEMBER 10: A Thai elephant scoops up a coffee bean mixture with fruit and rice at an elephant camp at the Anantara Golden Triangle resort on December 10, 2012 in Golden Triangle, northern Thailand. Black Ivory Coffee, started by Canadian coffee expert Blake Dinkin, is made from Thai arabica hand picked beans. The coffee is created from a process whereby coffee beans are naturally refined by a Thai elephant. It takes about 15-30 hours for the elephant to digest the beans, and later they are plucked from their dung and washed and roasted. Approximately 10,000 beans are picked to produce 1kg of roasted coffee. At USD 1,100 per kilogram or USD 500 per pound, the cost per serving of the elephant coffee equals USD 50, making the exotic new brew the world's priciest. It takes 33 kilograms of raw coffee cherries to produce 1 kilo of Black Ivory Coffee. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
Calculate price
View basket
Date created:
December 10, 2012
Editorial #:
158087450
Restrictions:
Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses.
Licence type:
Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Collection:
Getty Images News
Max file size:
3,900 x 2,600 px (33.02 x 22.01 cm) - 300 dpi - 2.39 MB
Release info:
Not released.More information
Source:
Getty Images AsiaPac
Object name:
72592102

Keywords

This image is subject to copyright. Getty Images reserves the right to pursue unauthorized users of this image or clip, and to seek damages for copyright violations. To learn more about copyright and Getty Images’ enforcement program, click here. Availability for this image cannot be guaranteed until time of purchase.
Thai elephant scoops up a coffee bean mixture with fruit and rice at... News Photo 158087450Agriculture,Anantara Golden Triangle,Bean,Camp,Coffee Crop,Elephant,Environmental Issues,Finance,Fruit,Horizontal,Human Interest,Nature,People,Rice,Scoop,Thai,Thailand,Tourist Resort,VariationPhotographer Collection: Getty Images News 2012 Getty ImagesGOLDEN TRIANGLE, THAILAND - DECEMBER 10: A Thai elephant scoops up a coffee bean mixture with fruit and rice at an elephant camp at the Anantara Golden Triangle resort on December 10, 2012 in Golden Triangle, northern Thailand. Black Ivory Coffee, started by Canadian coffee expert Blake Dinkin, is made from Thai arabica hand picked beans. The coffee is created from a process whereby coffee beans are naturally refined by a Thai elephant. It takes about 15-30 hours for the elephant to digest the beans, and later they are plucked from their dung and washed and roasted. Approximately 10,000 beans are picked to produce 1kg of roasted coffee. At USD 1,100 per kilogram or USD 500 per pound, the cost per serving of the elephant coffee equals USD 50, making the exotic new brew the world's priciest. It takes 33 kilograms of raw coffee cherries to produce 1 kilo of Black Ivory Coffee. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)