TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Fabienne FAUR, U : News Photo

TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Fabienne FAUR, U

Credit: 
THOMAS CHENG / Staff
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Fabienne FAUR, US-HISTORY-ARCHIVES-POLITICS Tourists look at the information of the building (background) located at 604 H Street, on June 6, 2012, connected to the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theatre, five blocks from this site in Washington,DC. During the Civil War, this modest brick house was occupied by a Maryland-born widow, Mary Surratt, who was arrested, tried, and hanged with three others connected the assassination plot. A report by the first doctor to attend to Lincoln, Dr. Charles Leale, lost for the past 147 years, was discovered in late May 2012 at the National Archives in Washington, DC, according to US media reports. Lincoln was shot on the night of April 14, 1865 by Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth during a performance of 'Our American Cousin' at Ford's Theater in Washington, DC. AFP PHOTO/THOMAS CHENG (Photo credit should read THOMAS CHENG/AFP/GettyImages)
Caption:
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Fabienne FAUR, US-HISTORY-ARCHIVES-POLITICS Tourists look at the information of the building (background) located at 604 H Street, on June 6, 2012, connected to the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theatre, five blocks from this site in Washington,DC. During the Civil War, this modest brick house was occupied by a Maryland-born widow, Mary Surratt, who was arrested, tried, and hanged with three others connected the assassination plot. A report by the first doctor to attend to Lincoln, Dr. Charles Leale, lost for the past 147 years, was discovered in late May 2012 at the National Archives in Washington, DC, according to US media reports. Lincoln was shot on the night of April 14, 1865 by Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth during a performance of 'Our American Cousin' at Ford's Theater in Washington, DC. AFP PHOTO/THOMAS CHENG (Photo credit should read THOMAS CHENG/AFP/GettyImages)
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Date created:
June 07, 2012
Editorial #:
145937175
Restrictions:
Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses. Full editorial rights UK, US, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Canada (not Quebec). Restricted editorial rights elsewhere, please call local office.TO GO WITH AFP STORY
Licence type:
Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Collection:
AFP
Max file size:
3,648 x 2,736 px (128.69 x 96.52 cm) - 72 dpi - 3.78 MB
Release info:
Not released.More information
Source:
AFP
Barcode:
AFP
Object name:
Was6548873

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by Fabienne FAUR USHISTORYARCHIVESPOLITICS Tourists look at the... News Photo 145937175Abraham Lincoln,Assassination,Block,Building,Connection,Ford,Geographical Locations,Horizontal,Human Sciences,Information,Look,Science and Technology,Site,Theater,USA,Washington DCPhotographer Collection: AFP 2012 AFPTO GO WITH AFP STORY by Fabienne FAUR, US-HISTORY-ARCHIVES-POLITICS Tourists look at the information of the building (background) located at 604 H Street, on June 6, 2012, connected to the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theatre, five blocks from this site in Washington,DC. During the Civil War, this modest brick house was occupied by a Maryland-born widow, Mary Surratt, who was arrested, tried, and hanged with three others connected the assassination plot. A report by the first doctor to attend to Lincoln, Dr. Charles Leale, lost for the past 147 years, was discovered in late May 2012 at the National Archives in Washington, DC, according to US media reports. Lincoln was shot on the night of April 14, 1865 by Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth during a performance of 'Our American Cousin' at Ford's Theater in Washington, DC. AFP PHOTO/THOMAS CHENG (Photo credit should read THOMAS CHENG/AFP/GettyImages)